The Terminal

The Terminal Review

by O. Spooner

Rating: 4 out of 5.

‘This film is inspired by the story of a real refugee, Merhan Nasseri who landed at an airport near Paris and was refused entry into England after they found out that their refugee pass and passport were stolen – only in this case it’s rebels who revolt against their country that force the main character, Victor, to be trapped in JFK.’

Director: Steven Spielberg

Actors: Tom Hanks, Catherine Zeta-Jones & Stanley Tucci

Synopsis: When his country is in the clutches of war, an immigrant is forced to live in JFK Airport as he doesn’t technically have a nationality, so he can’t go into New York or go back to his country.

First of all, this film is inspired by the story of a real refugee, Merhan Nasseri who landed at an airport near Paris and was refused entry into England after they found out that their refugee pass and passport were stolen – only in this case it’s rebels who revolt against their country that force the main character, Victor, to be trapped in JFK. Something that’s quite strange is that the set used in the film isn’t based off on JFK, it’s actually based on Düsseldorf international airport in Germany, though the set is actually very well done and is actually all to scale, with them making it in an abandoned hangar. The story is very well plotted and there are also some good scenarios in which Victor helps his new friends in the airport, including when he helps his friend get married.

There are a few problems with this film as there are a few continuity errors (won’t say what it is as it contains a spoiler) and there are a few misinterpretations in the film – during one scene, the man in charge of immigration mentions an episode of the Twilight Zone called “Nightmare at 30,000 feet” and the episode is actually called “Nightmare at 20,000 feet.” In another scene, Victor is trying to get a visa, which he then proceeds to do every day. In reality, this would decrease his chance of acceptance when he gets his nationality back as he would have been denied multiple times. In a scene, Amelia Warren (Catherine Zeta-Jones) explains that a wedding gift given by Napoleon to his wife Josephine is inscribed “destiny”, but it’s actually inscribed “to destiny”. I wouldn’t really count this as an error because it still has the word destiny in it, and she did say destiny, so it is both an error and not an error at the same time.

Overall, this film is a great watch and I strongly recommend it.

The Terminal is currently available on Netflix and was rated 12 by the BBFC.

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