BoJack Horseman: Season 6 (Part 1)

BoJack Horseman: Season 6 (Part 1) Review

by T. Knight

**** 4 Stars

Complaints aside, the show continues to be the best written show on Netflix, with the writers continuing to deliver with the alliterative puns, tight dialogue, and the existential crises that the show is renowned for.

Stars: Will Arnett, Amy Sedaris, Aaron Paul, Alison Brie, Paul F. Tompkins

The show picks up where it left off, following BoJack signing into rehab, something which he should’ve done many years ago. Over the course of the series, we see him come to term with the process of joining, working through and eventually leaving, rehab. This season also works to tie up the loose ends from the end of season 5, with Princess Carolyn raising her baby, Diane working on her latest project, Mr. Peanutbutter working through his relationship with his fiancé, Pickles, and Todd continuing to be Todd. Watching BoJack’s colourful cast of secondary characters was enjoyable as ever, with each getting their time to shine, with the writing being as sharp and witty as ever.


I was disappointed with the show not doing more with the character of Gina, who was ever present during season 5, and played a key role in the emotionally heavy finale, so for the show to only use her briefly, rather than explore the aftermath of season 5 in greater detail seemed a little shallow. Although, it must be considered that this was only the first half of the final season, so here’s hoping that the show irons everything out before it comes to a close. It certainly seems like it plans to, as during the final episodes, the writers go out of their way to show that BoJack’s past is absolutely coming back to haunt him, in a number of ways. However, the way the show executes this does seem a little too convenient, though it certainly serves as quite the set-up once it all sinks in.

Complaints aside, the show continues to be the best written show on Netflix, with the writers continuing to deliver with the alliterative puns, tight dialogue, and the existential crises that the show is renowned for. Seeing BoJack finally move towards becoming a newer, happier, and healthier person feels very rewarding after having stuck with him throughout the rest of the seasons, and while it’s a shame that the show has to come to a close – especially considering how out of the blue it was on Netflix’s side – the show seems to be building to a fitting end, and I’ve got faith in the writers, and that they’ll make sure there’s no hanging threads come the finale in January.


Ultimately this first half of the final season for BoJack Horseman stands shoulder to shoulder with the rest of the excellent seasons of the show, and is a rewarding watch for those who’ve stuck with BoJack through thick and thin, despite one or two shortcomings.

BoJack Horseman is currently available on Netflix and it was rated 15 by the BBFC.

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